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Lights

Tyres

Wheel Bearings

Head Bearing

Forks

Chains

Sprockets

Brakes

Extras

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Lights

Headlights, rear lights, indicators and brake lights should work properly.

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Tyres

When will my tyres fail?

1. When it is worn.

The legal limit for the tread depth on the 3/4 of the tyre surface is to be more than 1mm at any point. While the rest of the 1/4 should have visible tread.

2. Has a damaged sidewall.

Sidewall is not allowed to have any cracks, damages or tears even if it is repaired.

More about tyres here

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Wheel Bearings

A worn or faulty wheel bearing not just spoils your bike handling and comfort, but also is dangerous and a reason for an MOT failing.

Lift the wheel off the ground and move the wheel side to side. If you can feel any play, your wheel bearing(s) are faulty. Spin the wheel, check for stiffness, rough running or some noise, any of these also indicates a worn bearing.

Expert advice: The most reliable way to test is to remove the wheel, and spin the bearing with your hand. This method will tell you the smaller faults too as you will feel where it stiffens or has a play.

More about wheel bearings here

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Head Bearing

You should ideally ask a second person to help you perform the check. Place the bike on the stand so that the front wheel is off the ground (not on a front paddock stand). If you have a centre stand, your helper sits as far back as possible on the seat, while you grip the lower end of the fork with both hands and jerk it back and forth. If there is play in the bearing, it must be re-adjusted, which means undoing the clamp bolts of the sliders (lower triple tree) and the large central bolt of the upper triple tree. After adjustment, there should be no play in the bearing and it should run smoothly.


The second test concerns the condition of the bearing. Turn the fork to the straight-ahead position, then turn the handlebars as if into a gentle right-hand bend, and then into a left-hander from the straight-ahead position. If the fork is stiff, or if it sticks even slightly in certain positions, the bearing must be replaced. However, bear in mind that cables, shafts and hydraulic hoses can falsify the test result. There is often a sticking point in the straight-ahead position because it is the most heavily used.

 

Expert advice: Check and adjust your head bearing regularly as a not properly adjusted bearing go wrong much faster.

More about head bearings here

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Forks

The most common problem is a leaking fork seal which is a straight reason to MOT failing as some fork oil on your front tyre or brake is dangerous.

Hold the front brake and push the front of the bike a couple of times. If you notice any leaking or oil rim on the tube it needs fixing before you can pass the MOT.

More about forks here

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Chains

When the chain gets loose or noisy this means that it's time to replace your chain. If your chain is loose or in poor quality, you will need to get this fixed.

More about chains here

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Sprockets

Sprockets need to be replaced when the teeth looks sharper.

More about sprockets here

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Brakes

Carry out regular checks for both the brake pads and discs.

Disc:

You will find the minimum thickness in your manual, in most cases it is also printed on the side of the disc. Always measure the thickness where the disc gets connected to the pads as this is the place where it will get the thinest.

 

Pads:

The legal limit is 1.5 mm at any point, however sometimes the pad plate can get rusty underneath the ceramic part cause it to get floppy and in some cases you may even lose it. It is very important that when this happens you replace the pads immediately. Brake pads with NRS technology can prevent this scenario and will give you longer lifetime and less noise.

More about brakes here

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Extras

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